Proof of our own research studies

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Future needed competencies for the 4th industrial revolution research outcomes.

We have studied several scientific research studies undertaken and published by numerous authoritative institutions worldwide, on needed skills and competencies for the fourth industrial revolution.

Here in the image below is just a small sample of six of the many research publications we have studied:

Sample of six research publications image

In summary it comes down to the following broad competencies, as agreed upon by member countries of the World Economic Forum:

Think systems, not technologies
Empowering, not determining
By design, not by default
Values as feature, not a bug
Transformation leadership dexterity

In more detail it comes down to the following competencies, by Dr JH Oosthuizen:

This position paper further expands on the intelligence types of Schwab (2016), and Oosthuizen (2016), to create a ten-factor intelligence type framework, namely:

1. Contextual (the mind) – how we understand and apply our knowledge (Schwab, 2016).
2. Emotional (the heart) – how we process and integrate our thoughts and feelings and relate to ourselves and to one another (Schwab, 2016).
3. Inspired (the soul) – how we use a sense of individual and shared purpose, trust, and other virtues to effect change and act towards the common good (Schwab, 2016).
4. Physical (the body) – how we cultivate and maintain our personal health and well-being and that of those around us to be in a position to apply the energy required for both individual and systems transformation (Schwab, 2016).
5. Entrepreneurial (the disposition) – how we recognise opportunity through synthesis of the whole and creative combination of resources (Oosthuizen, 2016).
6. Strategic (the orientation) – how we adapt to changing environments (Wells, 2012); gather, examine and disseminate intelligence of strategic value (Djekic, 2014).
7. Transdisciplinary (the perspective) – how we understand a system in relation to its larger environment, relationships and connections, bringing the information from separate disciplines together to create useful knowledge (Montuori, 2013:47).
8. Ecosystem (the coalescence) – how we grow and develop within the setting of the system of relationships that form our environment, the impact the environmental factors have on us, and how we impact one another and our environment (Bloom & Dees, 2008:47).
9. Socratic (the philosophy) – how we analyse ideas in terms of their opposites with the objective of creating a more enlightened synthesis (Chaffee, 2013:62).
10. Ethical (the morals) – how we differentiate between what is right and what is wrong, reach decisions and make choices based on this differentiation (Rich, 2013:4).

A conceptual 4th Industrial Revolution Intelligence (4IRI) framework is subsequently proposed, namely:

1. Contextual Intelligence (CI); plus
2. Emotional Intelligence (EI); plus
3. Inspired Intelligence (II); plus
4. Physical Intelligence (PI); plus
5. Entrepreneurial Intelligence (EntI); plus
6. Strategic Intelligence (SI); plus
7. Transdisciplinary Intelligence (TI); plus
8. Ecosystem Intelligence (EcoI); plus
9. Socratic Intelligence (SocI); plus
10. Ethical Intelligence (EthI).

The image displayed below provides a schematic representation of the framework.

Ten competencies image

To stay relevant, companies are reconsidering how their talent requirements need to evolve, to meet the skills and workforce challenges created by rapid digitalization.

Attract, retain and develop talent: Be a great place to work for millennials and diverse employees. Empower and incentivize the workforce through development opportunities. Create a workforce with great digital skills AND great interpersonal skills.

Bring leadership beyond digital: Hire people with open mindsets and a willingness to change the status quo. Foster a culture from the top that is comfortable with digital technologies. Train senior leaders to “zoom in and zoom out”.

Adapt to different ways of working: Create environments where automation and artificial intelligence enhances humans. Prepare for the rise of the on-demand workforce.

The 7 technologies changing our world:

1. Computing capabilities, storage and access: Between 1985 and 1989, the Cray-2 was the world’s fastest computer. It was roughly the size of a washing machine. Today, a smart watch has twice its capabilities.

2. Big data: Each time you run a Google search, scan your passport, make an online purchase or tweet, you are leaving a data trail behind that can be analysed and monetized. Thanks to supercomputers and algorithms, we can make sense of massive amounts of data in real time. Computers are already making decisions based on this information, and in less than 10 years computer processors are expected to reach the processing power of the human brain. This means there’s a good chance your job could be done by computers in the coming decades. Two Oxford researchers, Carl Bendikt Frey and Michael A Osborne, estimated that 47% of American jobs are at high risk of automation.

3. Digital health: Analysing medical data collated from different populations and demographics enables researchers to understand patterns and connections in diseases and identify which conditions improve the effectiveness of certain treatments and which don’t. Big data will help to reduce costs and inefficiencies in healthcare systems, improve access and quality of care, and make medicine more personalized and precise. In the future, we will all have very detailed digital medical profiles … including information that we’d rather keep private.

4. The digitization of matter: 3D printers will create not only cars, houses and other objects, but also human tissue, bones and custom prosthetics. Patients would not have to die waiting for organ donations if hospitals could bioprint them. In fact, we may have already reached this stage: in 2014, doctors in China gave a boy a 3D-printed spine implant, according to the journal Popular Science.

5. The internet of things: Within the next decade, it is expected that more than a trillion sensors will be connected to the internet. If almost everything is connected, it will transform how we do business and help us manage resources more efficiently and sustainably. Connected sensors will be able to share information from their environment and organize themselves to make our lives easier and safer. For example, self-driving vehicles could “communicate” with one another, preventing accidents. By 2020 around 22% of the world’s cars will be connected to the internet (290 million vehicles), and by 2024, more than half of home internet traffic will be used by appliances and devices. Home automation is also happening fast. We can control our lights, heating, air conditioning and security systems remotely, but how much longer will it be before sensors are able to detect crumbs under the table and tell our automated vacuum cleaners to tidy up?

6. Blockchain: Only a tiny fraction of the world’s GDP (around 0.025%) is currently held on blockchain, the shared database technology where transactions in digital currencies such as the Bitcoin are made. But this could be about to change, as banks, insurers and companies race to work out how they can use the technology to cut costs. A blockchain is essentially a network of computers that must all approve a transaction before it can be verified and recorded. Using cryptography to keep transactions secure, the technology provides a decentralized digital ledger that anyone on the network can see.

7. Wearable internet: Technology is getting increasingly personal. Computers are moving from our desks, to our laps, to our pockets and soon they will be integrated into our clothing. By 2025, 10% of people are expected to be wearing clothes connected to the internet and the first implantable mobile phone is expected to be sold.

Top 10 skills demands for 2022, by World Economic Forum, published 2018:

1. Complex Problem Solving Skills (including creative problem solving and learning from critical disagreements)
2. Critical Thinking and Self-Awareness (including ability to understand and control/correct emotional reflexes and instinctive biases)
3. Creativity (including the confidence and courage skills necessary to challenge the status quo and to tolerate the ambiguities/uncertainties of the creation process)
4. People Skills (including fact-based and consequence-focused feedback exchange, driving engagement, awareness and respect of diversities, cultivating high ethical standards and coherence)
5. Coordinating with Others (including personal influence skills, purpose-based intentional and rotational leadership, ability to hold clear mutual accountability in a collaborative, often virtual, context)
6. Emotional Intelligence (including self-awareness, active listening, effective two-way open communication, empathy, authenticity and courage of transparency)
7. Judgment and Decision Making (including proactive initiative, system analysis and learning on the fly)
8. Service orientation (including humble self confidence and open dialogue)
9. Negotiation (including positive orientation, mastering of both push and pull communication skills and multicultural/multi-functional fluency)
10. Cognitive Flexibility during Critical Situations (keep in calm, open to learn and generally resilient in front of uncertainties, ambiguities, disagreements and major change)

According to the World Economic Forum, the above skills translates to the following skills descriptions, which will grow in importance for 2022 (precisely what we are trying to dish out on a platter!):

  1. Analytical thinking and innovation
  2. Active learning and learning strategies
  3. Creativity, originality and initiative
  4. Technology design and programming
  5. Critical thinking and analysis
  6. Complex problem-solving
  7. Leadership and social influence
  8. Emotional intelligence
  9. Reasoning, problem-solving and idea creation
  10. Systems analysis and evaluation

It looks like the above two top ten skills can still be reconciled and combined, maybe into a top 12 skills.

Click the e-book image below to read the amazing revelations in a PDF file:

Blinking moth eyes animation

Explanatory description of a best system

“Encourage and empower subordinates to empower yourself!”

What the next 20 years will mean for jobs – and how to prepare. Jobs of today will become obsolete, but not people, as job content will shift.  See it here: https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2019/01/jobs-of-next-20-years-how-to-prepare/

 

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