• Look into the future | Visualise what you can see in your minds eye
    Early leadership development header image

  • Board the flight with us | We can take you to your visualised destiny
    Leadership improvement club header image

Review of the art of public speaking

Posted by: | Posted on: Oct 25, 2017

Coaching header image

Review of the art of public speaking self-training course

The self-training course consists of a 275 pages training manual and 50 audio’s.

Thousands of politicians and businessmen from many countries attended this very same face-to-face workshop course.

The only difference is that it is now a self-training distance training course.

Course benefits:

By: Dale Carnegie (1888-1955): “A great start to shaking off public speaking jitters, socializing and mastering the art of small talk”.

The principles of public speaking written by Dale Carnegie decades ago in this book are timeless. They are just as effective in working a crowd in today’s society as they were back then. He delves into ways of commanding and charming an audience with the right energy, tone of voice, pitch, pronunciation and vocabulary. Armed with the principles highlighted in this book, you can do more than convey a message to a group of people, you can move them.

Carnegie gives useful advice and hints on public speaking stating that when you have something to say, are adequately prepared and have mastered an audience then public speaking success is eminent. He delivers a topic by topic approach offering solutions to common public speaking problems. Moreover, each chapter features practice questions and exercises to help the reader understand the subject better.

By reading this book, you can acquire confidence before an audience; efficiently convey your message by inflection, change of pace, emphasis and subordination. You can learn to influence people through exposition, description, narration, suggestion, argument and persuasion.

Throughout the book there are numerous quotes and references from influential individuals and institutions to emphasize the subject. The book is also riddled with numerous stories and examples to expound on the subject and to paint a picture in the reader’s mind on what constitutes an effective public speaker as well as what kind of speech is considered effective.

Many people who think they are good public speakers are left in doubt after reading this book. ‘The Art of Public Speaking’ is an essential tool to help you learn to work a crowd, leave them charmed and hanging onto your every word.

Dale Carnegie’s classic book The Art of Public Speaking is chock full of timeless tips of practical public speaking wisdom as relevant and true today as they were when the text was first published in 1915. The Art of Public Speaking by Dale Carnegie and Joseph B. Esenwein is a manual for people who have to speak in public, and it is still in use today. Whether the occasion in question is sharing travel experiences with friends, a toast for newly-weds, or a public debate, the tips and tricks collected in this book will come handy anywhere.

The book describes how to make effective use of one’s voice and gestures, how to gain and convey confidence in front of a large audience, and which methods to use to convert the listeners to one’s own cause. Each chapter contains examples and a list of practice exercises. The last 15 sections are real speeches by famous men to function as a study aid.

Dale Carnegie, author of the legendary How to Win Friends and Influence People, began his career as the premier “life coach” of the twentieth century by teaching the art of public speaking.

Public speaking, as Carnegie saw it, is a vital skill that can be attained through basic and repeated steps.

This is an intensive and thoroughly tested course to help the business and professional man in his speaking, both public and in private. The course has aided thousands of business and professional men to become creditable speakers, many of whom were formerly unable to say half a dozen sentences effectively when facing an audience. This course has developed men.

It has increased their faith and vision, and shown them how to use their latent forces to the fullest possible extent. It has made leaders out of many who were previously only mute followers.

Dale Carnegie Training shows how the tried and tested Dale Carnegie principles are still relevant in today’s digital world. Since 1912, business professionals and organizations have turned to Dale Carnegie’s powerful books and winning interactive seminars to help them reach new levels of success.

Dale Carnegie Training’s professional corporate, leadership, and teambuilding training courses, offered online and in the classroom will help your organizational development program meet your business needs.

The art of public speaking:

The art of public speaking ebook ecover

Table of contents for “The art of public speaking” (275 pages, 32 chapters and 18 appendixes):
Foreword
Chapter 1 – Acquiring confidence before an audience
Chapter 2 – The sin of monotony
Chapter 3 – Efficiency through emphasis and subordination
Chapter 4 – Efficiency through change of pitch
Chapter 5 – Efficiency through change of pace
Chapter 6 – Pause and power
Chapter 7 – Efficiency through inflection
Chapter 8 – Concentration in delivery
Chapter 9 – Force
Chapter 10 – Feeling and enthusiasm
Chapter 11 – Fluency through preparation
Chapter 12 – The voice
Chapter 13 – Voice charm
Chapter 14 – Distinctness and precision of utterance
Chapter 15 – The truth about gesture
Chapter 16 – Methods of delivery
Chapter 17 – Thought and reserve power
Chapter 18 – Subject and preparation
Chapter 19 – Influencing by exposition
Chapter 20 – Influencing by description
Chapter 21 – Influencing by narration
Chapter 22 – Influencing by suggestion
Chapter 23 – Influencing by argument
Chapter 24 – Influencing by persuasion
Chapter 25 – Influencing the crowd
Chapter 26 – Riding the winged horse
Chapter 27 – Growing a vocabulary
Chapter 28 – Memory training
Chapter 29 – Right thinking and personality
Chapter 30 – After-dinner and other occasional speaking
Chapter 31 – Making conversation effective
App. A: 50 Questions for Debate
App. B: 30 Themes for Speeches with Source-References
App. C: Suggestive Subjects for Speeches; Hints for Treatment
App. D: Speeches for Study and Practice – Newell Dwight Hillis
App. D: Speeches for Study and Practice – Henry Watterson
App. D: Speeches for Study and Practice – John Morley
App. D: Speeches for Study and Practice – Robert Toombs
App. D: Speeches for Study and Practice – Theodore Roosevelt
App. D: Speeches for Study and Practice – Alton B. Parker
App. D: Speeches for Study and Practice – John W. Wescott
App. D: Speeches for Study and Practice – Henry W. Grady
App. D: Speeches for Study and Practice – William Mc. Kinley
App. D: Speeches for Study and Practice – John Hay
App. D: Speeches for Study and Practice – William Jennings Bryan
App. D: Speeches for Study and Practice – Rufus Choate
App. D: Speeches for Study and Practice – Albert J. Beveridge
App. D: Speeches for Study and Practice – Russell Conwell
App. D: Speeches for Study and Practice – Victor Hugo

Dale Carnegie’s Top 10 Tips for Improving Your Social Skills, by HENRIK EDBERG

“The ideas I stand for are not mine. I borrowed them from Socrates. I swiped them from Chesterfield. I stole them from Jesus. And I put them in a book. If you don’t like their rules, whose would you use?”

“Who was Dale Carnegie?” you may wonder. Well, he was a guy that was born 110 years ago. He died in 1955. He was a rich man, a very successful man.

Dale Carnegie profile photo

“Forget yourself by becoming interested in others. Do every day a good deed that will put a smile of joy on someone’s face.” – Dale Carnegie, the very first person in history to initiate, lead and do research on human interrelationships.

He wrote a little book called “How to Win Friends and Influence People”. It went on to sell over 30 million copies. It still sells today and is probably one of the best books on how to improve your social skills.

Carnegie then continued to write more books and to create courses on how to interact with people, on how to make friends and on how to gain influence. Her are a few of the books:

Nine books by Dale Carnegie image

In this article I’ll explore 10 of my favourite tips from Dale Carnegie. And as the opening quote says, these tips have been time-tested for the last few hundreds or thousands of years. They are pretty solid:

1. Create your own emotions.

“If you want to be enthusiastic, act enthusiastic.”

Emotions work backwards too. You can use that to your advantage. If you are stuck in a negative emotion then you can often shake it off. Change your body – how you move, sit and stand – and act as you would like to feel. Enthusiasm and other positive emotions are much more useful and pleasurable for everyone in an interaction. Because…

2. It’s not so much about the logical stuff.

“When dealing with people, remember you are not dealing with creatures of logic, but creatures of emotion.”

This is so key. Logic is good but in the end, in interactions and in life, we are emotional creatures. We send and receive emotions from other people. That is one reason why body language and voice tonality is often said be up to 93% of communication. Now, those numbers were for some specific situations but I still believe that these two ways of communication are very, very important.

The body language and the voice tonality is a bit like the rest of the iceberg, the great mass below the tip of the words we use. Those two things communicate how we are feeling and give indication to what we are thinking. And that’s why it’s important to be able to change how you feel. To be in a positive mood while interacting. Because that will have a great impact on how you say something and how you use your body. And those two things will have a big impact on your results and relationships.

3. Three things you are better off avoiding.

“Any fool can criticize, condemn, and complain but it takes character and self control to be understanding and forgiving.”

Now these things may not be easy to avoid all together. Much of our interactions and perhaps even bonds are created and maintained through those three negative C’s. There is a sort of twisted pleasure in criticising, condemning and complaining. It might make you feel more important and like a better person as you see yourself as a victim or as you condemn other people’s behaviour.

But in the end these three C’s are negative and limiting to your life. Bringing up negative stuff and wallowing in it will lower your mood, motivation and general levels of wellbeing. And this can trap you in a negative spiral of complaining, complaining with other complainers and always finding faults in your reality.

You will also be broadcasting and receiving negative emotions. And people in general want to feel good. So this can really put an obstacle in the way for your interactions or relationships.

4. What is most important?

“The royal road to a man’s heart is to talk to him about the things he treasures most.”

Classic advice. Don’t talk too much about yourself and your life. Listen to other people instead. However, if they ramble on and on, if they don’t reciprocate and show and interest in your life then you don’t have to stay.

Some things people may treasure the most include ideas, children, a special hobby and the job. And…

5. Focus outward, not inward.

“You can make more friends in two months by becoming interested in other people than you can in two years by trying to get other people interested in you.”

A lot of people use the second, far less effective way. It is appealing because it’s about instant gratification and about ME, ME, ME! The first way – to become interested in people – perhaps works better because it make you a pleasant exception and because the law of reciprocity is strong in people. As you treat people, they will treat you. Be interested in them and they will be interested in you.

I would like to add that one hard thing about this can be to be genuinely interested in the other guy/gal. Your genuine interest is projected though your body language and tonality. So, just waiting for the other person to stop talking so you can talk again isn’t really genuine interest. And that may shine through. And so your interactions will suffer.

6. Take control of your emotions.

“The person who seeks all their applause from outside has their happiness in another’s keeping.”

It wrote about this problem a few days ago in 9 Great Ways to Make Yourself Absolutely Miserable. And it basically consist of being too reliant or dependent on external validation from other people. External validation is something someone communicates to you that tells you that you are person of value. That you, for example, are pretty, smart or successful.

This leaves much of your emotions in the hands of other people. It becomes an emotional rollercoaster. One day you feel great. The next day you feel like just staying in bed.

But if you fill that inner cup of validation for yourself instead then you take over the wheel. Now you’re driving, now you control how you feel. You can still appreciate compliments of course, but you aren’t dependent on them.

This will make you more emotionally stable and enables you to cultivate and build your emotional muscles in a more controlled way. You can for instance help yourself to become more optimistic or enthusiastic more of the time. This stability and growth can be big help in your relationships.

7. No, they are not holding you back.

“Instead of worrying about what people say of you, why not spend time trying to accomplish something they will admire.”

Caring too much about what people think will create and feed imaginary monsters within your mind. You may for instance think that people will condemn you if you try something. Maybe they will. But most of the time people are thinking about their own challenges and ups and downs. They just don’t care that much about what you do.

This may feel disappointing. It can also be liberating. It helps you remove inner obstacles that are you holding yourself back.

As you, bit by bit or in one big swoop, release those inner brakes you become more of yourself. You become more confident, you have a better chance at success, and you will feel more positive feelings and less negative ones. All these things can give a big boost to your interactions and help you sharpen those social skills.

8. So, what’s in it for me?

“There is only one way… to get anybody to do anything. And that is by making the other person want to do it.”

If you want someone to do something then will they care about your motivation for getting this thing done? Perhaps. Often they will not have that great of an interest in what you want out of something.

They want to know what they will get out of it. So, for the both of you to get what you want out of something tell that person what’s in it for him/her. And try to be genuine and positive about it. A reason for them to do it delivered in a lame, half-assed manner may not be so persuasive. And so you both lose.

9. How to win an argument.

“The only way to get the best of an argument is to avoid it.”

Getting two egos wrapped up in an argument, having two sides defending their positions desperately, will not improve relationships. You are more likely to feel negative feelings towards each other long after the argument is over. And so you both wallow in negativity and you both lose. When possible, just avoiding unnecessary arguments is a win-win situation.

10. It’s about more than your words.

“There are four ways, and only four ways, in which we have contact with the world. We are evaluated and classified by these four contacts: what we do, how we look, what we say, and how we say it.”

I often feel that there is a bit too much emphasis on the third way of contact (what we say). Don’t forget about the rest. Most people stereotype people at their first meeting. They might not want to but it is a way for their – and perhaps your – mind to organize impressions and people. So think about how you look. Think about how you make first impressions. Think about your body language. And how you are saying your sentences.

Think about how you feel because that will be reflected out into the world. And the world will often reflect back something similar.

DALE CARNEGIE’S SECRETS OF SUCCESS

A. Principles from How to Win Friends and Influence People
A1. Become a Friendlier Person
1. Don’t criticize, condemn or complain.
2. Give honest, sincere appreciation.
3. Arouse in the other person an eager want.
4. Become genuinely interested in other people.
5. Smile.
6. Remember that a person’s name is to that person the sweetest and most important sound in any language.
7. Be a good listener. Encourage others to talk about themselves.
8. Talk in terms of the other person’s interests.
9. Make the other person feel important – and do it sincerely.

A2. Win People to Your Way of Thinking
10. The only way to get the best of an argument is to avoid it.
11. Show respect for the other person’s opinion. Never say, “You’re wrong.”
12. If you are wrong, admit it quickly and emphatically.
13. Begin in a friendly way.
14. Get the other person saying “yes, yes” immediately.
15. Let the other person do a great deal of the talking.
16. Let the other person feel that the idea is his or hers.
17. Try honestly to see things from the other person’s point of view.
18. Be sympathetic with the other person’s ideas and desires.
19. Appeal to the nobler motives.
20. Dramatize your ideas.
21. Throw down a challenge.

A3. Be a Leader
22. Begin with praise and honest appreciation.
23. Call attention to people’s mistakes indirectly.
24. Talk about your own mistakes before criticizing the other person.
25. Ask questions instead of giving direct orders.
26. Let the other person save face.
27. Praise the slightest improvement and praise every improvement. Be “hearty in your approbation and lavish in your praise.”
28. Give the other person a fine reputation to live up to.
29. Use encouragement. Make the fault seem easy to correct.
30. Make the other person happy about doing the thing you suggest.
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

B. Principles from How to Stop Worrying and Start Living
B1. Fundamental Principles for Overcoming Worry
1. Live in “day tight compartments.”
2. How to face trouble:
a. Ask yourself, “What is the worst that can possibly happen?”
b. Prepare to accept the worst.
c. Try to improve on the worst.
3. Remind yourself of the exorbitant price you can pay for worry in terms of your health.

B2. Basic Techniques in Analyzing Worry
4. Get all the facts.
5. Weigh all the facts — then come to a decision.
6. Once a decision is reached, act!
7. Write out and answer the following questions:
a. What is the problem?
b. What are the causes of the problem?
c. What are the possible solutions?
d. What is the best possible solution?

B3. Break the Worry Habit Before It Breaks You
8. Keep busy.
9. Don’t fuss about trifles.
10. Use the law of averages to outlaw your worries.
11. Cooperate with the inevitable.
12. Decide just how much anxiety a thing may be worth and refuse to give it more.
13. Don’t worry about the past.

B4. Cultivate a Mental Attitude that will Bring You Peace and Happiness
14. Fill your mind with thoughts of peace, courage, health and hope.
15. Never try to get even with your enemies.
16. Expect ingratitude.
17. Count your blessings — not your troubles.
18. Do not imitate others.
19. Try to profit from your losses.
20. Create happiness for others.

B5. The Perfect Way to Conquer Worry
21. Pray.

B6. Don’t Worry about Criticism
22. Remember that unjust criticism is often a disguised compliment.
23. Do the very best you can.
24. Analyze your own mistakes and criticize yourself.

B7. Prevent Fatigue and Worry and Keep Your Energy and Spirits High
25. Rest before you get tired.
26. Learn to relax at your work.
27. Protect your health and appearance by relaxing at home.
28. Apply these four good working habits:
a) Clear your desk of all papers except those relating to the immediate problem at hand.
b) Do things in the order of their importance.
c) When you face a problem, solve it then and there if you have the facts necessary to make a decision.
d) Learn to organize, deputize and supervise.
29. Put enthusiasm into your work.
30. Don’t worry about insomnia.

Leadership development quotes from Dale Carnegie:

“If we want to find happiness, let’s stop thinking about gratitude or ingratitude and give for the inner joy of giving.” – Dale Carnegie

“Remember that the other man may be totally wrong. But he doesn’t think so. Don’t condemn him. Any fool can do that try to understand him. Only wise, tolerant, exceptional men even try to do that. There is a reason why the other man thinks and acts as he does. Ferret out that hidden reason-and you have the key to his actions, perhaps to his personality. Try honestly to put yourself in his place.” – Dale Carnegie

“You can make more friends in two months by becoming really interested in other people, than you can in two years by trying to get other people interested in you. Which is just another way of saying that the way to make a friend is to be one.” -Dale Carnegie

“One of the surest ways of making a friend and influencing the opinion of another is to give consideration to his opinion, to let him sustain his feeling of importance.” – Dale Carnegie

“This is a hurried age we’re living in. If you’ve got anything to say, say it quickly, get to the point and stop, and give the other man a chance to talk.” – Dale Carnegie

“Make a man laugh a good hearty laugh, and you’ve paved the way for friendship. When a man laughs with you, he, to some extent, likes you.” – Dale Carnegie

“Do you know the most important trait a man can have? It is not executive ability; it is not a great mentality; it is not kindliness, nor courage, nor a sense of humor, though each of these is of tremendous importance. In my opinion, it is the ability to make friends, which, boiled down, means the ability to see the best in man.” – Dale Carnegie

“We ought to be modest, for neither you nor I amount to much. Both of us will pass on and be completely forgotten a century from now. Life is too short to bore other people with talk of our petty accomplishments. Let’s encourage them to talk instead.” – Dale Carnegie

“Actions speak louder than words, and a smile says, “I like you. You make me happy. I am glad to see you.” That is why dogs make such a hit. They are so glad to see us that they almost jump out of their skins. So, naturally, we are glad to see them. An insincere grin? No. that doesn’t fool anybody. We know it is mechanical and we resent it. I am talking about a real smile, a heart-warming smile, a smile that comes from within, the kind of smile that will bring a good price in the market place.” – Dale Carnegie

“Let’s cease thinking of our accomplishments, our wants. Let’s try to figure out the other man’s good points. Then forget flattery. Give honest, sincere appreciation. Be “hearty in your approbation and lavish in your praise,” and people will cherish your words and treasure them and repeat them over a lifetime-repeat them years after you have forgotten them.” – Dale Carnegie

“If you and I want to stir up a resentment tomorrow that may rankle across the decades and endure until death, just let us indulge in a little stinging criticism-no matter how certain we are that it is justified. When dealing with people, let us remember we are not dealing with creatures of logic. We are dealing with creatures of emotion, creatures bristling with prejudices and motivated by pride and vanity.” – Dale Carnegie

“If you can be kind and considerate for one day, then you can be for another. It won’t cost you a penny in the world. Begin today.” – Dale Carnegie

“Forget yourself by becoming interested in others. Do every day a good deed that will put a smile of joy on someone’s face.” – Dale Carnegie

”There is only one way under high heaven to get the best of an argument – and that is to avoid it. Avoid it as you would avoid rattlesnakes and earthquakes. Nine times out of ten, an argument ends with each of the contestants being more firmly convinced than ever that he is absolutely right. You can’t win an argument. You can’t because if you lose it, you lose it; and if you win it, you lose it. Why? Well, suppose you triumph over the other man and shoot his argument full of holes and prove that he is non compos mentis. Then what? You will feel fine. But what about him? You have made him feel inferior. You have hurt his pride. He will resent your triumph.” – Dale Carnegie

“The sweetest sound to a man’s ears is his name” – Dale Carnegie

Conclusion: This training course in the art of public speaking remains to this day the best course on the subject available to all of mankind on the planet.

Biography: Dale Carnegie was born in 1888 in Missouri, USA and was educated at Warrensburg State Teachers College. As a salesman and aspiring actor, he travelled to New York and began teaching communications classes to adults at the YMCA. In 1912, the world-famous Dale Carnegie Course was born.

He authored several best-sellers, including How to Win Friends and Influence People and How to Stop Worrying and Start Living. Over 50 million copies of Mr. Carnegie’s books have been printed and published in 38 languages.

Mr. Carnegie was a prominent lecturer of his day and a sought-after counsellor to world leaders. He wrote newspaper columns and had his own daily radio show.

Dale Carnegie founded what is today a worldwide network of over 2,800 trainers with offices in more than 75 countries.

Founded in 1912, Dale Carnegie Training has evolved from one man’s belief in the power of self-improvement to a performance-based training company with offices worldwide. We focus on giving people in business the opportunity to sharpen their skills and improve their performance in order to build positive, steady and profitable results.

Subscribers to our occasional newsletter also get the following publications displayed here below:

“Expert speaker – a beginner’s guide to be a public speaking celebrity”:

Expert speaker ebook ecover

“Public speaking – from terror to triumph”:

Public speaking from terror to triumph ebook ecover



To get the download links, one must confirm the authenticity of one’s email address, by clicking the link in our email to you. If you do not confirm, the links will never reach you in our second email.

See the new self-training course titled “Public speaking for politicians and presenters” here below.

Click the image to open and download the PDF catalogue for later retrieval.

Public speaking catalogue ecover

part-of-paid-benefits.gif

Working entrepreneur footer image





Leave a Reply